My sister and I have been on our road trip around Victoria for 11 days now – stopping over in Bendigo and Ballarat; travelling the silo art trail (not the silo artworks in North East Victoria that I have previously written a post on); photographing our reflections on Lake Tyrrell; exploring the Lakes District around Kerang; and walking the Koondrook Barham Redgum Statue Walk.

Rochester was our last stop. We stayed just the one night as we were, by now, keen to get home. The next morning, we viewed Rochester’s silo artworks and took the river walk before heading for home early afternoon. These are two of the best things to see and do in Rochester. The third best thing to do in Rochester was eat – well worth mentioning given our food experience on this road trip.

Where is Rochester

Situated on the Campaspe River, Rochester, in Victoria (Australia), is 27 kilometres south of the Murray River Port of Echuca. The Murray River forms the border between Victoria and New South Wales, with the river actually situated in New South Wales.

Taking the fastest route, according to Google maps, Rochester is 187 kilometres north of Melbourne; 27 kilometres south of Echuca; and 240 kilometres south-west of Albury/Wodonga.

Silo artwork

Squirrel Glider and Azure Kingfisher painted on grain silos at Rochester, Victoria

Silo artworks of Squirrel Glider and Azure Kingfisher at Rochester, Victoria.

 

Rochester’s Silo Art project was the initiative of Rochester Business Network, with support from local businesses and the community. The silos themselves were provided by GrainCorp as ‘creative’ canvases for artworks on a massive scale. To give you an idea of perspective, the concrete silo is 22 metres high (approximately 72 feet), while the height of the metal silo is 18 metres (approximately 59 feet).

Located in the heart of town, the silos feature paintings of the endangered Squirrel Glider on the concrete silo and the Azure Kingfisher on the metal silo. Both are native to Australia.

This open-air gallery, completed in 2018, never closes and is free to visit. It is street art at its best.

The artist who designed and painted these magnificent murals, Jimmy DVate, is the very same artist who painted the silos at Goorambat in North East Victoria.

Jimmy is a Melbourne based artist and graphic designer whose talent has been recognised national and internationally. He is passionate about conservation and is particularly keen to highlight the plight of endangered species. Painting threatened Australian native fauna is a ‘signature’ of Jimmy’s artwork.

Of all the silo artworks we had seen on this road trip around Victoria, which took in the Silo Art Trail, the Rochester silos were my sister’s favourite. They rate very highly on my list too. I think I must have an affinity with Jimmy DVate’s artworks as his paintings on the silos at Goorambat also rate at the top of my favourites list.

River walk

Walking from the painted silos, we made our way to Rochester’s Red Bridge; a railway bridge crossing the Campaspe River. Built in 1876, the Red Bridge was our starting point for the 3-kilometre signposted river walk through the urban bushland that makes up the Campaspe River Reserve at Rochester.

The Red Bridge features in the background on the silo artwork of the Kingfisher.

The river walk is indicated by the red dotted line on the map below; from the brochure, Experience Rochester, courtesy of Rochester’s Visitor Information Centre.

The river walk route shown on the map of Rochester, Victoria

Map of Rochester, Victoria, showing the river walk route

 

The river walk meanders beside the Campaspe River through iconic Australian bush. For me, the Australian bush always gives me that sense of being home; no matter where in Australia I am experiencing it. And this walk did not disappoint. It was so peaceful. Just us two and birdsong.

This was an easy 3 kilometre walk along the riverbank. Being flat, it was not in the least bit challenging. Benches along the way provide a place to sit for a while and immerse yourself in the stillness and tranquillity.

The trees provide habitat for local wildlife. My sister enjoyed seeking and identifying the different species of native birds.

Rochester’s river walk through the Campaspe River Reserve is not just a bush walk but a history lesson along the way. Plaques dot the walk at specific points of local historical interest; providing insight into how the local Aboriginal people used the area. For example, pointing out ‘scarred’ trees caused when the bark was stripped by the Aboriginal people to make canoes, shields, containers and shelters. And the grooved rocks from grinding their axes.

The Campaspe River, a tributary of the Murray River (Australia’s principal river), is slow flowing along the walk through the Reserve – as is evidenced in the photos I took of the bush reflected in its waters.

When to go

We visited Rochester in the first week of May; towards the end of Australia’s autumn. The average daytime temperature for Rochester in May is 17 degrees Celsius; with an average of 5 rain days for the month. The temperature was just right for a bush walk along the river.

If you are looking at visiting Rochester at another time of year and wondering what the weather will be, you can find the information you need at, FarmOnline Weather.

Where to eat

On our 12-day road trip around Victoria, we struggled to find decent food. Food that gives you that feeling of satisfaction. Food that lets you know you have eaten well. We could count on one hand the number of good meals we had on this road trip. But Rochester scored 2 out of 2 – dinner at the Shamrock Hotel and breakfast at Kits Kafe.

Our decision to try the centrally located, historic Shamrock Hotel for dinner was good one. I had crumbed lamb chops on a bed of mashed potatoes, with seasonal steamed vegetables. My sister had the Thai Beef Stir Fry. We both agreed the food was excellent. These were some of the best pub meals we had ever eaten and were thoroughly enjoyed. Had we been staying another night, we would have gone back for seconds as there was much more on the menu we wanted to try.

Breakfast at Kits Kafe was a yummy affair. We both had the pancakes – mine with maple syrup and bacon and my sister’s with fruit cumquat and bacon. The service was excellent, the food delicious, and the coffee was worth going back for after our river walk.

We could see the silo artworks across the road from the Kits Kafe.

Where to stay

We stayed at the Rochester Motel, but there are other accommodation options available.

Our main reasons for stopping overnight at Rochester was to break the journey between Kerang and Albury, and to see the silo artworks, of which I had heard much about. The river walk was a very pleasant added bonus. As was our food experience. In all, we came away feeling very satisfied with our visit to Rochester.

 

Disclaimer: This post contains no affiliate links. All views and opinions are my own and non-sponsored. Unless specifically stated, all photos are my own and remain a copyright of Joanna Rath.

 

For more on Australia, read:

Unique Silo Art Celebrates Local Communities and Fauna

Food is Free laneway Engages Authentic Community Spirit

High Tea on the Yarra River, Melbourne