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A PHOTOGRAPHIC TOUR OF GEOFFREY BAWA’S GARDEN

With Sri Lanka being named the destination for 2019, tourism will only increase in this teardrop shaped nation. Finding places to visit away from the maddening crowds is a very good…

With Sri Lanka being named the destination for 2019, tourism will only increase in this teardrop shaped nation.

Finding places to visit away from the maddening crowds is a very good reason to visit Geoffrey Bawa’s garden as it is largely undiscovered by tourists, being something different from the ‘usual’ tourist attraction.

Not to be confused with Brief Garden – the former estate of Geoffrey’s older brother, Bevis.

Who was Geoffrey Bawa you say? He was Sri Lanka’s most well-known architect. In fact, he is deemed to be the most influential Asian architect of his time (dying in 2003). For those architect enthusiasts out there, he was one of the founding fathers of the architectural style known as, “tropical modernism”. Bawa is probably best known for designing Sri Lanka’s Houses of Parliament.

Living permanently in Colombo, Lunuganga Estate, situated on the banks of Dedduwa Lake in Bentota (midway between Colombo and Galle), was Geoffrey Bawa’s country retreat. Here, on 23 acres, he spent 50 years turning this abandoned rubber plantation (and prior to that, a cinnamon plantation) into gardens of multiple shades of green.

We explored the gardens with the Head Curator on a 2-hour private tour.

Don’t expect to find manicured gardens of colourful flowers, neat borders and gurgling fountains. But do expect a tamed, tropical wilderness of sudden vistas, intimate groves, sculptures and wide landscapes. I found Bawa’s garden to be a place of peace, tranquillity and restfulness.

Come take a stroll with me on a visual tour of Geoffrey Bawa’s garden.

Hen House

Hen house

The Hen House – in the same style as Sri Lanka’s Parliament House

Bawa designed Sri Lanka’s Parliament House and then designed his hen house (chicken coup) on the estate in the same style. Take from that what you will!

Sandela Pavilion

Sandela Pavilion

Sandela Pavilion where Bawa had his office

Sandela Pavilion is an open, airy space and served as Bawa’s office. From here he had a lovely view of the lake and could see anyone who arrived at the main gate.

The Red Terrace

Red Terrace

The Red Terrace

The Red Terrace derives its name from the red laterite ground surface, produced by the decomposition of the underlying rocks.

The Water Garden

Water garden

Water Garden where Bawa would sit

The water garden pond is shaped like a butterfly and covered with water lilies. The area has a number of sculptures and a bench seat beside the pond in the shade of trees. Here Bawa would sit and ring the garden bell for his gin and tonic to be brought to him.

Sculptures

There are a number of sculptures around the garden.

Sundial sculpture

Sundial sculpture in the water garden

'Hindu' Pan

Sculpture of the pagan god, Pan

 

 

The sundial sculpture (above left) in the water garden has an air of decline and abandonment. While the sculpture of the pagan god, Pan (above right) was called “Hindu” Pan by Bawa. No reason was given as to why he called it such.

The Plain of Jars

The Plain of Jars

Ming jars dot the landscape in an area know as “The Plain of Jars”

In a setting of sloping grassy plains with the occasional tall tree, the Ming jars that dot this part of the landscape were added here by Bawa.

Jack Fruit

Jack fruit

Jack Fruit – a tropical fruit growing on the Estate

 

The estate is set in Sri Lanka’s wet tropical zone.

So tropical fruits, like the Jack Fruit, are not unknown and grow to large proportions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cinnamon Hill House

Bawa's studio

Cinnamon Hill House

Cinnamon Hill House was used by Bawa as a studio from where he created his architectural designs. It was the last addition to the Garden.

Geoffrey Bawa’s Home

Bawa's former home

Geoffrey Bawa’s former home on the Estate

 

On Cinnamon Hill sits Geoffrey Bawa’s former home on the estate.

Lunch on the wide veranda of Bawa’s former home, with its views over the lake and a set menu of traditional Sri Lankan curries, was a visual and gastronomic pleasure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The gardens are open to the public and the buildings on the estate are run as a country house hotel. Should you like to have lunch whilst visiting the estate, a reservation is essential. For more information, go to the Geoffrey Bawa Trust website and click on “Lunuganga Country Estate”.

Wanting to know more on what to do in Sri Lanka? Click on the link to read about my walk along the railway line: Walking the Line in Sri Lanka from Ella to Demodara.

Related Post: First 24 Hours in Galle Fort, Sri Lanka

 

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WALKING THE LINE IN SRI LANKA FROM ELLA TO DEMODARA

When my son was little, his grandmother told him to say, “The devil made me do it”, whenever he was in trouble. On a recent trip to Sri Lanka with…

When my son was little, his grandmother told him to say, “The devil made me do it”, whenever he was in trouble.

On a recent trip to Sri Lanka with my sister and brother-in-law, my sister decided it would be an adventure to walk the 3 kilometres along the railway line from Ella to the iconic Nine Arch Bridge. From there we would decide whether to walk back to Ella or continue a further 3.5 kilometres along the railway line to Demodara train station, catching the Kandy-Colombo train back to Ella.

With all in agreement, and knowing the expected time the train departs Demodara, we set off at 8.20am after an early breakfast for our possible 6.5-kilometre walk.

Walking the railway line

Walking the railway line in Sri Lanka from Ella to Demodara

So, you ask, what’s the connection between walking a railway line in the hills of Sri Lanka and a grandmother teaching her grandson how to get out of trouble? Read on and the dots will be connected.

Just after stepping onto the railway line near our hotel, we were confronted with the sign, ‘WALK ON THE RAILWAY LINE IS PROHIBITED’. I immediately decided that when stopped by the railway police, I was going to tell them, “The devil made me do it”. I wonder how well this translates into Sinhala or Tamil? If that didn’t work, I was going to blame my sister, the hotel manager and guide books because they all suggested this escapade – a “must do” in Ella; to do as the locals do

I stopped worrying about ending up in a Sri Lankan prison when, about 5 metres further down the line, it became evident the authorities had given up telling people that walking the line is prohibited because there was now a sign advising that walking the railway line is dangerous. I relaxed. ‘Dangerous’ I can handle, but ‘prohibited’ goes against my ‘good girl’ nature.

However, ‘dangerous’ became a not-so-friendly companion again upon entering a tunnel that was impossible to see any light coming from the other end. Blindly feeling my way through the tunnel with my feet against the railway track, I wondered aloud what action should be taken in the event of a train coming whilst we are in the tunnel. Luckily, my brother-in-law had been thinking ahead and had consulted with the Hotel Manager; finding out what time we might come face-to-face on the Nine Arch Bridge with the train from Kandy.

Exiting tunnel

Exiting the tunnel at Nine Arch Bridge

Feeling relatively safe in the knowledge I was not about to be squished by a train, the walk through the tunnel became a devil-may-care adventure filled with excess adrenaline running rampant through my body. I imagined I was breaking new ground, being the first person to walk through a railway tunnel.

I may not have felt quite so safe, and would definitely have run out of adrenaline, had I known the tunnel exits right on the Bridge.

Pip and Wayne on Nine Arch Bridge

Walking the railway line on Nine Arch Bridge

The Nine Arch Bridge, a popular tourist attraction, spans a deep gorge and is surrounded by a vision of green; of tropical forest interspersed with tea plantations. And so-called because it has nine arches or spans. Very imaginative! At 91.44m (300ft) long, 7.62m (25ft) wide and 24.38m (80ft) high, this railway bridge is deemed to be an engineering marvel as it is made entirely of rocks, bricks and cement without a single piece of steel. Not knowing anything about engineering, I have to concur with the experts. What I do know is that its height and all those arches, plus the environment in which it is erected, make it one pretty and impressive bridge.

Here comes the train

Here comes the train down the line from Demodara

We had timed our arrival at the Nine Arch Bridge to watch the 9.15am train from Kandy cross the bridge. All the information you read about Sri Lankan trains tell you they rarely run on time. However, this one – my thanks to the driver – was on time and came down the line just after we crossed the bridge. Stepping off the tracks, I expressed my thanks with an enthusiastic wave to the driver and all the passengers. I was reliving a childhood experience. Mind you, one that I have never had. I have walked a gas pipeline before but never a railway line and have never been close enough to a train driver in a moving train to wave to him.

The Nine Arch Bridge is the midway point between Ella and Demodara stations. Having got this far, the decision was made to continue our walk along the railway line to Demodara to catch the 10.40am train back to Ella. I was on a mission now to reach Demodara in time to catch that train as I was not walking the 6.5 kms back to Ella.

Demodara Station

Waiting on Demodara Station for the train back to Ella

 

We made it to Demodara by 10.20am but weren’t allowed to purchase our train tickets immediately; being told to wait until 10 minutes before the train is due. No explanation was forthcoming as to why this is so. However, Demodara is such a pretty station, with its many potted flowering plants lining the station, we were happy to wait to be ‘allowed’ to buy our train tickets. When I did front up to the ticketing window, I thought I had misheard when asked to pay 30 Sri Lankan rupees (the equivalent of 30 Australian cents) for 3, one-way tickets from Demodara to Ella (10c each). I was so impressed with how cheap it was, I shouted my sister and brother-in-law their tickets.

Train ride to Ella

Train ride from Demodara to Ella, with locals hanging out the doors

The train was practically empty. Not what I had expected. This made choosing a seat difficult due to having too much choice. Which seat was going to give me the best view of the scenery as it passes by outside the window? In the end, I chose to stand in the doorway like a local.

The train ride, although short-lived, was fun and the highlight of my day. Anyone would think I have never ridden a train before!

This walk along the railway line is touted by guide books as a ‘must do’ activity when in Ella. However, we came across no other tourists except at the bridge itself. Is it too far off the beaten track for most tourists? We were the only non-locals walking the line. I had to smile whenever we passed a makeshift stall by the side of the rail tracks – they cater for people’s needs wherever they can!

Train on Nine Arch Bridge

Our train from Demodara to Ella crossing the Nine Arch Bridge

 

The walk had actually been very easy. It was flat all the way and you get into a routine as you lope from sleeper to sleeper. The constant views of tea estates, valleys and mountains made for a very pleasant walk. And the company was good too – not one disagreement!

Note: You can get to the Bridge by taking a tuk-tuk from Ella or by walking through the jungle. Or, do as a local does and walk along the railway line.

Read more on what to do in Sri Lanka:

A Photographic Tour of Geoffrey Bawa’s Garden

First 24 Hours in Galle Fort, Sri Lanka

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UNIQUE HORSEMANSHIP SKILLS ON SHOW AT A MONGOLIAN HORSE FESTIVAL

Dear Pip, We spent the day sharing in the excitement of a local horse festival in the Orkhon Valley, not far from Tsaidam Ger Camp (our accommodation for the night)….

Ready for competition
Mongolian horsemen ready for competition with their uurgas (lasso poles)

Dear Pip,

We spent the day sharing in the excitement of a local horse festival in the Orkhon Valley, not far from Tsaidam Ger Camp (our accommodation for the night).

Learning to ride almost from the day they can walk, Mongolia’s history, culture and peoples are intimately linked with horses. Perhaps inevitable in a country where there are 13 x more horses than people. Throughout the day, I came to appreciate the strong bond the nomads have with their horses.

After Meg shared snuff with the old men and our guide explained what the horse festival entailed, we found a pozzie amongst the locals to watch and photograph the men, dressed in traditional garb, compete in a number of events; events that showed off the nomads’ unique horsemanship skills and the strength of their horses.

I wasn’t sure how I felt about stampeding wild horses being lassoed but did laugh with the crowd when a competitor would manage to lasso a horse, only to end up on his bum, being dragged some distance by the frantic horse. I needed to remind myself, this is their way of life; their culture.

Men riding bucking wild horses elicited shouts of encouragement from the crowd and laughter as they fell off. One man who managed to stay on his horse delighted the crowd as he and his horse disappeared into the way blue wonder. 

I particularly enjoyed watching the men grabbing an uurga (long pole with a lasso on the end) off the ground from a galloping horse. I’m in awe as to how they stayed on their horse as they would be well down the side of the horse, around its fast-moving legs. Some of the younger men even had a go at grabbing a cigarette lighter off the ground from their running horse – some more successful than others.

A great day to remember.

Love,

Joanna

A competitor and his horse
Picking up an uurga off the ground from a running horse
Lassoing wild horses
Lassoing wild horses
Bucking horse
Ouch! Falling off a bucking wild horse
Picking up lighter
Picking up a cigarette lighter off the ground from a galloping horse


For more about Mongolia:
Fossil Hunting at the Flaming Cliffs in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert
How to Prevent Cultural Errors in Mongolia
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WORLD WEATHER – anytime and mostly anywhere

World Weather Information Service Are you planning a trip but unsure what to pack because you don’t know what the weather will be? OR Do you ask yourself which month…

World Weather Information Service

Are you planning a trip but unsure what to pack because you don’t know what the weather will be?

OR

Do you ask yourself which month is the best time to visit a specific place for warm weather?

OR

Do you want to go to Asia, missing the monsoon season, but don’t know which months have the highest rainfall?

 

My go-to resource to answer these and similar questions is the World Meteorological Organisation’s World Weather Information Service.

 

Here you can access reliable weather forecasts and conditions for most world cities. Specifically, you will find:

  • current temperature;
  • 5/6-day weather forecast;
  • time of sunrise and sunset;
  • average minimum and maximum temperature per month; and
  • average rainfall and rain days per month.

Note: The averages are based on information gathered over a 30-year period.

 

The “MyWorldWeather” is the mobile application of the World Weather Information Service and is available from the App Store and Google Play.

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LUXURY AFLOAT ON THE IRRAWADDY – Avalon Myanmar

Cruising down Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River aboard the Avalon Myanmar is my idea of ultimate relaxation. When this is done on a ship that I can only describe as ‘the height…

Cruising down Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River aboard the Avalon Myanmar is my idea of ultimate relaxation. When this is done on a ship that I can only describe as ‘the height of luxury’, my relaxation and experience become sublime.

To call the guest accommodation on the Avalon Myanmar ‘cabins’ is a misrepresentation of what you can expect. At 22.7 square metres (no matter which deck you are on), they are beautifully appointed suites, larger than many a hotel room I have stayed in. Each suite is appointed with a king-sized bed; a desk with chair; a two-seater couch; bedside tables; plenty of hanging space; and a large bathroom with a shower recess bigger than any of mine at home – and still has plenty of space to move around. A floor-to-ceiling glass wall opens two-thirds of the way to transform the room into an open-air balcony; truly allowing the outside in.

Whilst the restaurant is basic in appearance, there is nothing basic about the cuisine on offer. The buffet breakfasts and lunches and the à la carte dinners cater for all palates.

The combined flavours of noodles, vegetables, meat, broth and sauces used by the chef in his noodle soup created taste sensations I have not experienced before. Each time the noodle soup was on offer at lunch, I would go back for 2nd and 3rd helpings until I was so sated I was only capable of waddling back to my cabin for a ‘nanna’ nap.

Whilst the sun deck would benefit from some shade, the outdoor lounge area provides all the shaded fresh air wanted in lounge chairs you sink into. The indoor lounge area is inviting with its natural light, pastel fittings and functional but comfortable furnishings; creating a relaxing atmosphere for a quiet read, a game of cards with fellow passengers or a drink with friends.

With a maximum of 36 passengers and a crew/passenger ratio of 1:1.5, the ship boasts a high level of personal service and care whilst on board. From the on-board slippers to wear whilst your shoes are being cleaned after each shore excursion to knowing how I take my coffee by day 2 so that I never have to tell them again, that personal care and service is achieved with seamless, good natured ease, and always with a genuine smile.

The Cruise Director tells me Avalon is building a ship for sailing on India’s Ganges River; expected to be launched in 2017. Where do I book?

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THE WALLAWWA – a boutique hotel in Colombo

WHAT Imagine relaxing by the pool and being able to buzz for bar staff to attend to your needs. Or playing croquet on the manicured lawns before partaking of complimentary…

WHAT

Imagine relaxing by the pool and being able to buzz for bar staff to attend to your
needs. Or playing croquet on the manicured lawns before partaking of complimentary
tea and cakes at 3 o’clock on the wide veranda. This is just a taste of The Wallawwa, a
luxurious, boutique hotel whose former life was a colonial manor house. Set in acres of
lush gardens scattered with day beds and couches, the hotel’s 17 spacious rooms,
furnished with king-sized beds and incorporating large polished concrete-lined ensuites,
are comfortable and cool, with each room opening onto a secluded veranda and tropical
garden. The staff are friendly, efficient, attentive and helpful. The restaurant serves top
class Asian cuisine, with much of the produce used coming from the hotel’s organic
garden. And the deserts are to die for. If you must leave this piece of tranquillity, the
hotel can arrange excursions for you.

WHY

A secluded, oasis of tranquillity close to Colombo.

HOW

Rooms from $301 AUD per night, including à la carte breakfast.
thewallawwa.com

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A VENETIAN WALKABOUT

It is possible not to get lost in Venice if you allow yourself to just wander, with the very occasional “Where am I?” moments. The secret being that Venice has…

It is possible not to get lost in Venice if you allow yourself to just wander, with the very occasional “Where am I?” moments. The secret being that Venice has got wise and everywhere you go there are strategically placed signs pointing the way to St Mark’s Square and/or to Rialto Bridge, both major landmarks.

Venice is flat. The best way to see it is to just walk. With my camera slung over my shoulder, my favourite walking shoes on, and my trusty guide book in hand, I let my feet and curiosity find the direction.

Over four days my feet lead me to some wonderful experiences as I amble through and explore four of Central Venice’s six districts.

Come walk with me.

Day 1: San Marco

Leaving my hotel

in San Marco district, I wander down alleys, cross some of Venice’s 400 unique bridges and watch the waters of the canals lap the doorsteps of antique buildings in various states of glorious decay. Over a coffee in Campo Santa Maria Formosa, I see canal barges loading the linen from hotels and learn from the waiter it is taken off the islands to the mainland for laundering so as not to pollute the canals. Taking in my surroundings from one bridge, I witness a gondola traffic jam and am thankful I am not playing tourist. Everywhere I turn I see evidence of Venice’s unstable foundations, with lopsided arches and leaning church bell towers. So much to photograph. I have fallen in love with Venice.

Venturing down a very narrow alley near Campo Manin, requiring me to manoeuver through crab-like, I come across an unusual building with the most elegant external multi-arch spiral staircase – the gothic Palazzo Contarini del Bovolo. The staircase, with its ascending rows of round-headed arches, is the only one of its kind found in Venice today. Closed to the public, I let my camera do the sightseeing.

Palazzo Contarini del Bovolo

Palazzo Contarini del Bovolo

Stumbling across Piazza San Marco for the third time within half an hour, I know it is time to experience a coffee at Café Florian, the oldest café in Venice. At a cost of €15 for my coffee, I know it is an experience not to be repeated.

As I wander around Basilica San Marco, marvelling at the brilliant mosaics, I wonder at the story of St Mark’s body being stolen by two merchants from Alexandria in Egypt and brought back to Venice, and of the miracle of his body reappearing after being destroyed by fire.

I experience a sense of excitement as I watch an ambulance race down the Grand Canal and disappear into a side canal. The excitement doesn’t come from the errand the ambulance is on but from the alien sight of an ambulance being a boat and not a van.

Day 2: San Polo

Wandering around Rialto Market and chatting to the stallholders, I learn much about the humble tomato; that there are 25 varieties of tomatoes in Italy and no self-discerning stallholder will sell you tomatoes until it is known what is being cooked. This is very important because the stallholder must advise on just the right type of tomato to use as they all have a different taste and must accompany the right dish. I have to admit my palate is definitely not up to Venetian standards.

Walking past San Giacomo di Rialto’s 15th century 24-hour clock and through Campo San Polo, I find the shop Tragicomica on Calle dei Nomboli, which my research at home before leaving for Italy told me it sold traditional Venetian masks. The shop is crowded – with masks – and I wonder how I am ever going to find that special mask with my name on it. After a lengthy chat with the artisan Mask Maker about the different types of masks and how they are made, I buy an authentic Venetian, papier mâché plague doctor mask, with its long beak-like nose.

Sitting in a café opposite Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, A huge Gothic church, I spend a pleasant hour just people watching.

Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari

Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari

Day 3: Cannaregio

Walking the length of Strada Nova, and more, I make my way to Campo di Ghetto Nuovo, the Jewish Ghetto. This small square is distinguished by very tall buildings unique in Venice. Confined to a very small area, as the Jewish population grew and needed housing, the only way was up. The Ghetto’s five synagogues, unrecognisable from the square, date back to the 16th century. Through the Jewish museum’s guided tour, the only way possible to see these hidden treasures, I discover three of the five synagogues on the top floors of buildings – the French, German and Levantine, each representing a different ‘school’.

Back in Campo di Ghetto Nuovo, I contemplate the Holocaust memorials depicting Nazi brutality to the Jews.

Before the long walk back to my hotel I have lunch at Gam Gam at the entrance to the Jewish ghetto; leisurely eating my way through kosher antipasto with falafel and delicious Italian bread.

With my feet crying ‘enough’, I take a traghetto (pedestrian transport) across the Grand Canal, alighting near Rialto Market. In a traghetto, it is traditional to stand as you are rowed across the Canal. Do I save any walking distance? Probably not but for about 6 minutes there I feel like a true local and know I have experienced something few tourists can share.

Holocaust memorials, San Polo, Venice

Holocaust memorials, San Polo, Venice

Day 4: Castello

Dominating Castello is the Arsenale, the old naval shipyard. Whilst largely disused today and closed to the public, the gateway remains guarded by large lion statues.

Heading back towards Piazza San Marco, as I cross Ponte Canonica, I see for the first time Venice’s most famous and only covered bridge, the Bridge of Sighs (Ponte dei Sospiri). This little Baroque bridge spans the canal, Rio di Palazzo, between the New Prison and Palazzo Ducale (Doge’s Palace). From Ponte Canonica I have an uninterrupted view of the Bridge of Sighs for my camera to record the moment.

After a coffee and people watching on Riva degli Schiavoni, Venice’s most famous promenade, I take a tour that incorporates crossing the Bridge of Sighs. Walking across the Bridge, I sigh, just as the prisoners are supposed to have done when they crossed the Bridge from the interrogation rooms in the Doge’s Palace to the New Prison, knowing they would never walk back the other way. I learn Casanova is the most famous person to have crossed the Bridge of Sighs on his way to prison, from which he later escaped.

Bridge of Sighs, Venice

Bridge of Sighs, Venice

Venice beckons again. I need to finish my walk.

Where will your feet take you?

For more on Italy, read: “The Sassi di Matera – from national shame to cultural showcase”

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